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Video Resources

The Spinal Cord Central Video Room is currently a “screening room” for videos of particular interest to our members and the SCI/D community. Many subject area videos accompany their respective subject area materials and are reached as 'related pages' from the Video Room. This resource is made possible in part thanks to a grant from the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation.

1. Adjustment (after SCI/D)

1.1. Adjustment After SCI-Several Perspectives

Several individuals living with either paraplegia or quadriplegia-levels of spinal cord injury (SCI) relate their own experiences immediately after injury, relay how they view their lives and themselves now, and provide critical advice to others who sustain injuries and their family members as well.

1.2. Art and Music Therapy

Art and Music Therapy in Rehab and Beyond  (59 minutes)

How can experiences with art and music heal your heart, support your rehabilitation and enhance your life at any age? In this presentation by Northwest Regional SCI System, David Knott, Board Certified Music Therapist, and Rosalie Frankel, Board Certified Art Therapist, discussed the many benefits that can be gained through the creative arts therapies. Guest artist Brom Wikstrom (mouth-painter work displayed ) talked about his evolution as a professional artist since sustaining a spinal cord injury more than 30 years ago.

1.3. Communication in Dating & Relationships after SCI

Communication in Dating and Relationships after Spinal Cord Injury (Feb. 2010)

An SCI Forum provided by the Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

This video contains captioning. To turn captions off, press "Ctrl+Shift+C" while in the Windows Media player, or follow the instructions on your Windows Media player.

Click here to view the streaming video. (73 minutes)

(Mac users: to watch the video, you may have to download a program, which you can find at the following site: Microsoft Windows Media Components for QuickTime.)

Please note: In order to continue offering videos of their SCI Forums, the Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center needs to show their funding sources that consumers are watching and benefiting from them. After watching the video, please complete their two-minute survey. Thank you!

1.4. Conversations About Living with SCI

Conversations about... living with spinal cord injury

Presented on May 13, 2008 at the University of Washington Medical Center.

Three men and one woman, all with longstanding spinal cord injuries, talk about their personal experiences living, surviving and thriving with their injuries. They share their initial reactions, adjustment, steps toward independence and thoughts about their injuries now. This forum was videotaped and can be viewed as streaming video by clicking the link below.

(Mac users: to watch the video, you may have to download a program, which you can find at the following site: Microsoft Windows Media Components for QuickTime.)

This video contains captioning. To turn captions off, press "Ctrl+Shift+C" while in the Windows Media player, or follow the instructions on your Windows Media player.

Please note: In order to continue offering videos of our SCI Forums, we need to show our funding sources that consumers are watching and benefiting from them. After watching the video, please complete our two-minute survey. Thank you!

1.5. Conversations.....Artists

Conversations...artists
An SCI Forum provided by the Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center. Continuing their yearly theme of conversations with people who have spinal cord injuries, painter Brom Wikstrom and photographer Leslie Jewitt, discuss their art in the context of their SCIs. 
Presented on April 14, 2009, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

1.6. Conversations from the Bedroom: Sex after SCI

Conversations from the Bedroom: Sex after Spinal Cord Injury

Presented on May 10, 2011 at the University of Washington Medical Center by the Northwest Regional SCI System, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington.

Duration of video: 74 minutes. Please give your feedback after watching (two-minute survey).

What do you really want to know about sex after spinal cord injury? Most newly injured people have concerns
about what their sex lives will be like: will they ever have sex again (or for the first time)? Although sex
may change after SCI, most people still want to develop satisfying intimate relationships. How do they navigate
sexuality with an SCI? In this forum, real people with spinal cord injuries talk about their real sexual experiences since injury. Two men with tetraplegia (quadriplegia) and one woman with paraplegia discussed the good, the bad, and the funny. A rehab physician answered questions related to medical issues and sexual activity. Note: This video is of a frank sexual nature. Viewer discretion advised.

Click here to watch video.

If you prefer to watch the video using Windows Media Player, or if you would like to watch with closed-captioning, click here.

(Mac users: to watch the video, you may have to download a program, which you can find at the following site: Microsoft Windows Media Components for QuickTime.)

See a list of all our videos at http://sci.washington.edu/info/forums/forum_videos.asp.

1.7. Facing Disability after Spinal Cord Injury

Facing Disability after Spinal Cord Injury-FacingDisability.com brings you the voices of experience. It's the only place on the web where you can see and hear the most important answers to the questions we've all asked. They offer more than 1,500 short videos arraigned in a database by family relationship and type of question addressed.

1.8. Faith-Based Support and Adjustment

Helping Congregations Care for Members with Disabilities

Provided by BYU. Discovering ways individuals with disabilities and their family members can best be supported in religious settings...

Please view this 5 minute video helping to explain the perspective of families and how we can better understand their perspectives when it comes to religion in disabilities.

1.9. Getting your life back after Spinal Cord Injury

Getting your life back after spinal cord injury: Finding meaning through volunteering, school and work

This SCI Forum, presented on February 12, 2008 at the University of Washington Medical Center, consisted of five separate parts: four presentations and a panel discussion. Each part is offered as a separate video. Click on a link below to watch a video.

Please note: In order to continue offering videos of our SCI Forums, we need to show our funding sources that consumers are watching and benefiting from them. After watching the video, please complete our two-minute survey. Thank you!

(Mac users: to watch the video you may have to download a program, which you can find at the following site: Microsoft Windows Media Components for QuickTime.)

  • Part 1: Introduction and overview, by Steve Stiens, MD, associate professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington. How do people define and achieve success, satisfaction and happiness?

  • Part 2: Getting back into your community, by Michael Donofree, vocational rehabilitation counselor, Veterans Administration. Some ways to contribute to your community while enhancing your quality of life through school, work and volunteering.

  • Part 3: Vocational rehabilitation, by Tracy Zajac, vocational rehabilitation counselor, Washington State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). Zajac, who has a spinal cord injury, talks about her own post-injury training and employment and outlines the process of obtaining services from the DVR.

  • Part 4: Return to work: Facts and figures, by Matt Davis, MD, SCI Fellow, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington. This presentation discusses research into the factors that affect the likelihood that a person will become employed after spinal cord injury.

  • Part 5: Panel discussion, six individuals with SCI talk about their adjustment to living with SCI and how they moved forward and found their passions in life.

1.10. Life with SCI: A Group Discussion

Life with SCI: A Group Discussion (51 minutes)
Adjustment to life with SCI is best understood by those who experience it. This video is an open discussion of 5 individuals with SCI and their experiences on short- and long-term adjustment-related issues such as healthy grief, education, impact on relationships (self and partners), children, depression, and substance abuse. 56.2 mb download or watch now in streaming Real Media.

1.11. Moving forward after Spinal Cord injury

Documentary short: Moving Forward After Spinal Cord Injury

A video profile of Billy Price (C-6 quadriplegia)

This seven-minute video features Billy Price (right), whose life was upended 12 years ago when he sustained a C-6 complete spinal cord injury as a freshman in college. As he narrates his journey with quadriplegia —the traumatic early days, the challenges and achievements—we see the images of his present day life: driving to his full-time engineering job, living in his condo, tailgating with friends before a football game, and continuing his passion for skiing.

 

(Mac users: to watch the video, you may have to download a program, which you can find at the following site: Microsoft Windows Media Components for QuickTime.)

We hope to produce more short videos like this showing a variety of individuals with SCI—different ages and injury levels, men and women—living full and satisfying lives after SCI. Is this a good idea? Please give us your feedback:

After watching the video, click here to complete a one-minute survey.

If you have difficulty watching this video on your computer, or if you would like to obtain a DVD of the video, please contact us at scirehab@u.washington.edu or call 206-616-8568.

Funding for this video was provided by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) in the U.S. Department of Education, grant number H133N000003. Additional funding was provided by the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation.
© Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System, 2008

 

1.12. Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after Spinal Cord Injury

Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center, SCI Forum- 52 minutes

Resilience, Depression and Bouncing Back after Spinal Cord Injury
Presented on October 13, 2015.
Adjustment and mental health problems after spinal cord injury can be complicated and sometimes difficult to talk about. While most people with SCI do not become depressed, it is important to identify and help those who do. This SCI Forum presentation focuses on who gets depressed after SCI, when and why. Charles Bombardier, PhD, professor and psychologist in the UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, covers what is known about common pat­terns of adjustment after SCI and how emotional responses to SCI compare to other forms of loss and trauma. He discusses risk factors for depression and what can be done to manage and treat depression after SCI.

 

1.13. SCI Video Blog

SCI Video Blog is a collection of tutorial videos posted by SCI individuals of all different levels of injury to visually demonstrate how they perform their daily life activities. The website allows individuals with new spinal cord injuries to search for videos based on their level of injury, ASIA level, completeness of the injury, and SCI complications, among other things. The website also allow writers and bloggers to share their knowledge or story with the world. For individuals or family members with a language barrier, the website plans on providing subtitles in many languages as well.

1.14. Spinal Cord Injury: From the Moment of Injury to Leading a Full and Healthy Life

Part of the Boston Medical Center Stepping Forward-Staying Informed Evening Lecture Series.  This lecture was delivered on March, 2010 by Dr. Steve Williams. 

1.15. Survive, Subsist, Succeed: Spinal Cord Injury Outcomes

Survive, Subsist, Succeed: Spinal Cord Injury Outcomes
By John D. Steeves, Professor and Founding Director, ICORD (International Collaboration On Repair Discoveries), and UBC and Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, BC.
Presented on May 20, 2010, at the University of Washington Medical Center

SEE additional Adjustment resources in Knowledge Book by that name

2. Day in the Life: Video Series from Magee Rehabiliation

2.1. Day in the Life: Home Mobility

Home Mobility - Practical application of bed mobility, dressing techniques on the bed and in the wheelchair, bathroom accessibility and modification. Demonstration of a build in chair lift, education on skin maintaince and integrity, as well as overall home accessibility.

Magee Rehab, through a grant from the Kessler Foundation, has developed a four part series, "A Day in the Life" all which show those with spinal cord injuries—and who are in wheelchairs—how to adapt to their new physical limitations and be self-sufficient. Topics addressed include cooking in the kitchen, overall home mobility, dressing, home modifications, accessibility in the home and community, running errands, car transfers, public transportation, shopping, going out with friends, working out, and weight lifting to name a few.

2.2. Day in the Life: Community Mobility (Part 1)

Community Mobility (Part 1) - Practical application of mobility from a wheelchair level outside the home. Going out to eat, going shopping, and running errands as well as demonstration of and personal techniques for car transfers.

Magee Rehab, through a grant from the Kessler Foundation, has developed a four part series, "A Day in the Life" all which show those with spinal cord injuries—and who are in wheelchairs—how to adapt to their new physical limitations and be self-sufficient. Topics addressed include cooking in the kitchen, overall home mobility, dressing, home modifications, accessibility in the home and community, running errands, car transfers, public transportation, shopping, going out with friends, working out, and weight lifting to name a few.

2.3. Day in the Life: Community Mobility (Part 2)

Community Mobility Part 2 - Practical application of and demonstration of using public transit and taxi cabs. What to expect, what is expected of the rider and the driver.

Magee Rehab, through a grant from the Kessler Foundation, has developed a four part series, "A Day in the Life" all which show those with spinal cord injuries—and who are in wheelchairs—how to adapt to their new physical limitations and be self-sufficient. Topics addressed include cooking in the kitchen, overall home mobility, dressing, home modifications, accessibility in the home and community, running errands, car transfers, public transportation, shopping, going out with friends, working out, and weight lifting to name a few.

2.4. Day in the Life: Working Out (Part 1)

Working out (Part 1) - Practical application of strengthening exercises as well as multiple demonstrations of transfers to/from the wheelchair and work out equipment. Personal testimony to benefits of working out, demonstration of circuit and utilization of free weights from a wheelchair level

Magee Rehab, through a grant from the Kessler Foundation, has developed a four part series, "A Day in the Life" all which show those with spinal cord injuries—and who are in wheelchairs—how to adapt to their new physical limitations and be self-sufficient. Topics addressed include cooking in the kitchen, overall home mobility, dressing, home modifications, accessibility in the home and community, running errands, car transfers, public transportation, shopping, going out with friends, working out, and weight lifting to name a few.

2.5. Day in the Life: Working Out (Part 2)

Working out (Part 2) - Practical application of strengthening exercises as well as multiple demonstrations of transfers to/from the wheelchair and work out equipment. Personal testimony to benefits of working out, demonstration of circuit and utilization of free weights from a wheelchair level.

Magee Rehab, through a grant from the Kessler Foundation, has developed a four part series, "A Day in the Life" all which show those with spinal cord injuries—and who are in wheelchairs—how to adapt to their new physical limitations and be self-sufficient. Topics addressed include cooking in the kitchen, overall home mobility, dressing, home modifications, accessibility in the home and community, running errands, car transfers, public transportation, shopping, going out with friends, working out, and weight lifting to name a few.

3. Advocacy

3.1. Conversations about advocacy

SCI Forum

 

'Conversations about advocacy...making a difference for yourself, your community and the world' from the Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System

Presented on October 12, 2010 at the University of Washington Medical Center.

Advocacy: the act or process of advocating or supporting a cause or proposal. Sometimes you need to take care of yourself. Sometimes you look out for people in your own backyard. And sometimes the issue affects the
global community. This is a panel discussion with four individuals with spinal cord injuries who are advocates on a number of levels: from individual accommodations to health care, civic issues and spinal cord injury research.

(Mac users: to watch the video, you may have to download a program, which you can find at the following site: Microsoft Windows Media Components for QuickTime.)

This video contains captioning. To turn captions off, press "Ctrl+Shift+C" while in the Windows Media player, or follow the instructions on your Windows Media player.

Please note: In order to continue offering videos of our SCI Forums, we need to show our funding sources that consumers are watching and benefiting from them. After watching the video, please complete our two-minute survey. Thank you!

SEE Advocacy Knowledge Book for more

3.2. Disability Rights in California (June 20 2011)

New video and publications available about rights of Californians with disabilities

Sacramento, CA –  A new Youtube video, a weekly electronic newsletter, and a bestsellers publication CD have just been produced by Disability Rights California to reach people with disabilities with information about their rights and related services.  

As the state's social safety net frays, Disability Rights California (DRC) is making a concerted effort to reach out to the hundreds of thousands of children, youths and adults who need disability advocacy and legal services to become or remain independent, or access education, health or other critical services.

Designated the state's protection and advocacy system for Californians with disabilities, we offer free legal and advocacy services to those who need them to resolve disability-related issues.  In 2010, the most frequently requested services concerned: obtaining regional center services for people with developmental disabilities; access to education, healthcare, and information about benefits; how to preserve autonomy and privacy; and fight against abuse.

In an effort to get the word out about our free services and trainings about rights, we produced a variety of products, including this 6 minute YouTube video.

Call 800-776-5746 to order

3.3. The Affordable Care Act and People with Disabilities: Policy and Politics

Part of the Boston Medical Center Stepping Forward-Staying Informed Evening Lecture Series

4. Caregivers

4.1. Caregivers for those living with SCI/D

Personal caregivers
Three individuals with quadriplegia share their experiences and tips for hiring, managing and (when necessary) firing personal caregivers. Following these presentations, a rehabilitation psychologist discusses maintaining personal boundaries with personal caregivers.
Presented on April 8, 2008, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

5. Emergency Preparedness

5.1. Worst Case Sceanarios: Be Prepared

Worst case scenarios: Be prepared! Emergency Preparedness for Everyone
By Tracey Connelly, Emergency Preparedness Training Specialist for the City of Seattle.
Presented on April 10, 2007, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

6. Empowerment: SCI Empowerment Series

6.1. SCI Empowerment Video Series - Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System

The Empowerment Project is a program within the University of Washington Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System, designed to foster healthy aging after SCI and reduce SCI survivors' vulnerability to medical problems that can decrease their independence and quality of life as they get older. Click HERE to view the list of topics and watch the videos. 

7. Growing to Adulthood with SCI/D

7.1. Growing to Adulthood with Spinal Cord Injury or Disorder

Growing to Adulthood with Spinal Cord Injury or Disorder was produced by the NW Regional SCI System.

The SCI Forum 'Growing into Adulthood with a Spinal Cord Injury', which took place on November 10, 2009 at Seattle Children's Hospital, is available for viewing on our website as streaming video.


Everyone faces challenges when transitioning from the teen years into adulthood. Making this transition with a spinal cord injury can be even more complicated. In this first ever SCI Forum at Seattle Children's Hospital, we invited a panel of individuals who were injured as children or teens to talk about their experiences growing up with SCI -- leaving the family home after high school, pursuing higher education or job training, negotiating the world of work, and developing personal relationships.

Please give the NW Regional SCI System your feedback after watching the video. Just click the "two-minute survey" link on the forum page, or go to survey here.

 

Please refer to the Pediatric SCI/D Knowledge Book for additional Pediatric resources.

8. Health & Wellness videos

8.1. Aging sith SCI/D

Aging with a Spinal Cord Injury
By Rina Reyes, MD, Medical Director of the UW SCI Rehabilitation Program and Assistant Professor in the UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, and Ivan Molton, PhD, Rehabilitation Psychologist and Acting Assistant Professor in the UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
Presented on June 9, 2009, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

Everybody's Doing It! Aging with a Spinal Cord Injury People with SCI are living longer after injury than ever before. Consequently, they can now expect to live long enough to develop the same kinds of age-related health problems that affect the general population. What are the special concerns for people aging with a spinal cord injury and what can they do to age well and stay as healthy as possible? In this forum, our panel of experts—five people with SCI who, taken together, have been living with SCI for 189 years!—discuss their experiences and share their methods for coping with changes and staying healthy and positive as they age. Presented on October 9, 2012 at the University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA

8.2. Autonomic Dysreflexia

Autonomic dysreflexia
By Janna Friedly, MD, Harborview Medical Center, assistant professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington.
Presented on October 9, 2007, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

8.3. Bladder management after SCI/D

Bladder management streaming video presentations:

Bladder Management (33 minutes) (UAB)
This video outlines the importance of bladder management on QOL. The types of bladder management programs and techniques are illustrated (Male and female anatomical models utilized to demonstrate proper techniques). Prevention and treatment of UTI Risks for stone formation are also discussed. 55.2 mb download or watch on streaming real media.

Management of Urinary Problems Caused by Spinal Cord Injury
By Stephen Burns, MD, Staff Physician, SCI Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Associate Professor, Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington.
Presented on October 13, 2009, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

 

Advances in treatment of urologic conditions in the SCI patient. By Elizabeth A. Miller, MD, Assistant Professor of Urology, University of Washington.
Presented on November 14, 2006, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

   

8.4. Bowel Care

Bowel Care streaming video presentation from UAB:

Bowel Management (25 minutes)
This video stresses management and its importance on QOL, predicting bowel movements, avoiding bowel accidents, Bowel care procedures, Anatomical model demonstrations. Impact of nutrition, water, medications on bowel management, and colostomy management. 37 mb download or watch on streaming real media.

 

Taking Care of Business: Your Bowel Program
SCI Forum presented on October 8, 2013 at the University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Most people with spinal cord injuries have changes in bowel function and are not able to empty their bowels normally. Newly injured individuals must learn how to use medications, diet, timing and other means to avoid incontinence or constipation, empty their bowels predictably, prevent medical complications, and feel confident out in the community. Since each person is unique, often some trial and error is part of this process. While most people eventually find a bowel program that works for them, some have ongoing problems, and others develop new complications as they age. Learn about bowel problems and solutions at this Forum featuring an overview by Beth Hall, RN, rehab nurse at Harborview Medical Center, followed by a panel of individuals with SCI discussing their different bowel management situations.

8.5. Fitness after Spinal Cord Injury

Universal fitness: Fitness after SCI
By Cathy Warms, PhD, ARNP, CRRN, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington.
Presented on May 8, 2007, at Harborview Medical Center.


The Impact of Obesity in Spinal Cord Injury
Part of the Boston Medical Center Stepping Forward-Staying Informed Evening Lecture Series

The Benefits of Exercise for Those with Spinal Cord Injury
Part of the Boston Medical Center Stepping Forward-Staying Informed Evening Lecture Series

8.6. Management of Urinary Problems Caused by Spinal Cord Injury

  • Management of Urinary Problems Caused by Spinal Cord Injury
    The SCI Forum presentation, Management of Urinary Problems Caused by Spinal Cord Injury, which took place on October 13, 2009 at the University of Washington Medical Center, is available as streaming video and written report. In this presentation, Stephen Burns, MD, Associate Professor, UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and staff physician, SCI Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of emptying the bladder and describes some of the testing used to screen the bladder and kidneys. In addition, two individuals with spinal cord injury talk about their personal experiences with bladder management problems and solutions.

8.7. Medications after Spinal Cord Injury

From Ambien to Zanaflex: Making your medications work for you
By Debra Page, PharmD Clinical Pharmacist,
Neurology & Rehabilitation Medicine, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington.
Presented on October 10, 2006, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

SEE appropriate Health & Wellness Knowledge Book condition section relating to a particular medications prescribed use.

8.8. Nutrition

1.  Everyday Nutrition for Individuals with SCI - a SCI forum presentation that took place on April 12, 2011 at the University of Washington Medical Center.  This presentation discusses the unique nutritional needs of individuals with spinal cord injuries and provides tips for incorporating your nutritional goals into your daily eating habits. Topics include calorie guidelines, protein requirements and other nutrients needed for maintaining healthy skin, heart, weight and bones and for promoting bowel and bladder health.

2.  Nutrition guidelines for individuals with SCI
By Vickeri Barton, RD, CD, Dietitian, Harborview Medical Center.
Presented on June 13, 2006, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

8.9. Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis in spinal cord injury
By Jelena Svircev, MD, assistant professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, VA Puget Sound Health Care System
Presented on October 9, 2007, at the University of Washington Medical Center

8.10. Pain Management

 

UAB provided pain management video:

Pain Management (34 minutes)
This video stresses the importance on QOL. It covers Pain subtypes (Neuropathic, Musculoskeletal, Visceral) and offers general medical and psychosocial management techniques. 40.8 mb download or watch on streaming real media

 

Multidisciplinary Management of Pain in Spinal Cord Injury: An Approach to Improve Pain, Function and Psychological Coping
By Dr. Kathleen Burgess, physiatrist; Randy Hermans, physical therapist; and Dr. James Moore, psychologist and director of the Rehabilitation Institute of Washington.
Presented on June 8, 2010, at the University of Washington Medical Center

 

Using hypnosis for spinal cord injury pain management
By Shelley Wiechman Askay, PhD, clinical psychologist, Harborview Medical Center, assistant professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington.
Presented on September 11, 2007, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

SCI Forum video "Managing Chronic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury"
from the Northwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury System
Chronic (or long-standing) pain is a common problem for people living with spinal cord injury, and it is often very difficult to treat. In this forum video, two UW Rehabilitation Medicine clinicians discuss the different types, causes and potential treatment options for chronic pain. Deborah Crane, MD, MPH, assistant professor and rehab physician at Harborview, reviews medications, surgical options, injections, pumps, massage, and other treatments. Dawn Ehde, PhD, professor and rehab psychologist discusses different self-management strategies for decreasing and coping with chronic pain, including relaxation, pacing and hypnosis.

8.11. Respiratory Management

UAB provided Respiratory Management video:

Respiratory Management (18 minutes)
This video covers signs, symptoms and general treatment options of a potentially life-threatening conditions such as Atelectasis, Influenza, pneumonia, Pulmonary embolisms, Sleep apnea and Ventilator use. Discusses Self-Care issues such as Smoking cessation, Congestion, Vaccinations (influenza and pneumonia), and Weight Management. 23.9 mb download or watch on streaming real media.

8.12. Secondary Conditions of Spinal Cord Injury

Education is the foundation for improved health, independence, and quality of life of individuals with spinal cord impairments (SCI), which includes individuals with spinal cord injuries, diseases and dysfunctions. This is the Secondary Conditions of Spinal Cord Impairment Health Education Video Series. This 11-part video series is intended to be equally useful for persons with spinal cord impairments at home or by health and rehabilitation centers for education and training activities.

Secondary Conditions of SCI Video Series Order Form

For improved quality, you can purchase the 3 DVD series.
Understanding Spinal Cord Impairments and Functional Goals (26 minutes)
This video offers a basic understanding of the normal function of the spinal cord and the impact of impairment at different types and levels of injury. In addition, functional goals are addressed for levels of impairment. 39.1 mb download or watch now in streaming Real Media.
Life with SCI: A Group Discussion (51 minutes)
Adjustment to life with SCI is best understood by those who experience it. This video is an open discussion of 5 individuals with SCI and their experiences on short- and long-term adjustment-related issues such as healthy grief, education, Impact on relationships (self and partners), children, depression, and substance abuse. 56.2 mb download or watch now in streaming Real Media.
Sexuality & Sexual Function (59 minutes)
The first part of this video explores psychological aspects of sexuality such as expressing sexuality, sexual adjustment, managing personal care issues, confronting issues with body image issues, and working through relationship issues. The second part explores physical aspects of sex following SCI for both men and women. This includes arousal, sexual function and dysfunction, sexual activities, and fertility 106 mb download or watch on streaming real media.
Bowel Management (25 minutes)
This video stresses management and its importance on QOL, predicting bowel movements, avoiding bowel accidents, Bowel care procedures, Anatomical model demonstrations. Impact of nutrition, water, medications on bowel management, and colostomy management. 37 mb download or watch on streaming real media.
Bladder Management (33 minutes)
This video outlines the importance of bladder management on QOL. The types of bladder management programs and techniques are illustrated (Male and female anatomical models utilized to demonstrate proper techniques). Prevention and treatment of UTI Risks for stone formation are also discussed. 55.2 mb download or watch on streaming real media.
Pressure Sores: Skin Care Prevention and Treatment (2 Parts)
Part 1 of this 41 minute video reviews describes skin functions & risk factors for pressure sores, prevention of pressure sores such as proper seating, weight shifts, and nutrition. The impact of a pressure sore on QOL is explored. 56.2 mb download or watch on streaming real media. Part 2 is a 10 minute video that utilizes an anatomical model to demonstrate techniques for general care and treatment options for the four stages and unstageable pressure sores and tunneling wounds. Please note that the pressure ulcer stages were updated for 2007. See our SCI Infosheet on Prevention of Pressure Ulcers for the updated stages. 10 mb download or watch on streaming real media.
Pain Management (34 minutes)
This video stresses the importance on QOL. It covers Pain subtypes (Neuropathic, Musculoskeletal, Visceral) and offers general medical and psychosocial management techniques. 40.8 mb download or watch on streaming real media.
Spastic Hypertonia (27 minutes)
This video defines Spastic Hypertonia (aka spasticity), explaining the advantages vs disadvantages of spasticity, and general treatment options if desired. Also offers a general understanding of sensation and reflex. 40.7 mb download or watch on streaming real media.
Respiratory Management (18 minutes)
This video covers signs, symptoms and general treatment options of a potentially life-threatening conditions such as Atelectasis, Influenza, pneumonia, Pulmonary embolisms, Sleep apnea and Ventilator use. Discusses Self-Care issues such as Smoking cessation, Congestion, Vaccinations (influenza and pneumonia), and Weight Management. 23.9 mb download or watch on streaming real media.
Cardiovascular Health (38 minutes)
This video examines the signs, symptoms and general treatment options of potentially life-threatening conditions such as Autonomic Dysreflexia, Hypotension, and Deep Vein Thrombosis. Also discusses Self-Care and General recommendations on maintaining heart health, including emergency treatment responses. 58.2 mb download or watch on streaming real media.

Bone Health (19 minutes)
This video discusses aspects of Heterotopic Ossification (Classifications, Etiology, Diagnosis, Prevention and treatment options) and Osteoporosis (Initial bone loss after traumatic injury, Impact of aging, Impact of menopause, Prevention and treatment options). 58.2 mb download or watch on streaming real media.

8.13. Sexuality & Sexual Function

Sexuality and SCI video

Professional guidance and key input from knowledgeable content experts living with SCI in areas such as redefining life and sex after SCI, dating and relationships, practical positioning tips demonstrated, all with an authentic 'realness' foundation.

UAB provided sexuality video: Sexuality & Sexual Function (59 minutes)

The first part of this video explores psychological aspects of sexuality such as expressing sexuality, sexual adjustment, managing personal care issues, confronting issues with body image issues, and working through relationship issues. The second part explores physical aspects of sex following SCI for both men and women. This includes arousal, sexual function and dysfunction, sexual activities, and fertility 106 mb download or watch on streaming real media.

Sexability
Is there sex after spinal cord injury? Kelly Arbor of Babeland discusses how sexuality and intimacy are available to everyone, regardless of disability.
Presented on February 10, 2009, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

Conversations from the Bedroom: Sex after Spinal Cord Injury Two men and one woman with spinal cord injuries discuss their experiences with sex and intimacy.
Presented on May 10, 2011, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

How-To SCI Sex Position Videos
a 7-minute video, with Dr.Mitch Tepper — one of the best sexologists in the world specializing in the sexual health of the disabled. And the reason Dr. Tepper is so great — he's disabled himself. A quad since a diving accident in 1982 when he was a lifeguard, Dr. Tepper really cares about the subject of sex.  He also covers Tantric sex and talking to your partner openly. And don't worry — watching these videos is a PG-13 affair. All of the participants in each video are clothed, and the topics are shown a very straight-forward way.

8.14. Shoulders, arms and hands-Maintaining & Exercising

Our Information Specialists particlarly value this series of video presentations presented by the Northwest Regional SCI Model System.

On NW Regional SCI System site:

      After watching, please complete their two-minute survey.

This forum presentation describes how rehab uses a combination of conventional   therapy (strengthening, splinting, and use of adaptive equipment and strategies), upper limb electrical stimulation, and surgical intervention (tendon transfers) to achieve rehab goals. The presenters show an abundance of devices and solutions for enhancing independence in everyday activities such as eating, dressing, grooming, cooking and writing.

Northwest Regional SCI Model System needs your feedback. After watching the video, please complete their 2-minute survey. Thank you.

For a complete list of the Northwest Regional SCI Model Systems streaming videos, go to http://sci.washington.edu/videos.

 

8.15. Skin Care and Pressure Sores

UAB provided videos on pressure sores:

Pressure Sores: Skin Care Prevention and Treatment (2 Parts)
Part 1
of this 41 minute video reviews describes skin functions & risk factors for pressure sores, prevention of pressure sores such as proper seating, weight shifts, and nutrition. The impact of a pressure sore on QOL is explored. 56.2 mb download or watch on streaming real media.

Part 2 is a 10 minute video that utilizes an anatomical model to demonstrate techniques for general care and treatment options for the four stages and unstageable pressure sores and tunneling wounds. Please note that the pressure ulcer stages were updated for 2007. See our SCI Infosheet on Prevention of Pressure Ulcers for the updated stages. 10 mb download or watch on streaming real media.


From Boston Medical Center SCI lecture series:

The Skin You're In: An Overview of Maintaining Skin Integrity for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

From Northwest Regional SCI System Forum:  Pressure Ulcers Can Wreck Your Life: Preventing and Managing Skin Problems after SCI  This 50 minute video is presented in 2 parts.  The video includes vital information about preventing pressure ulcers, inspecting your skin, recognizing early signs of skin breakdown, treatment options available, monitoring and managing healing and much more. Photos of pressure ulcers in different stages are also included.

8.16. Sleep

Sleep Problems and Sleep Apnea in Persons with SCI This 80 minute streaming video is presented in 2 parts; Part 1 focuses on sleep problems while Part 2 addresses sleep apnea.  Many people with spinal cord injuries have trouble getting a good night's sleep. Pain, breathing difficulties, and the need for care periodically through the night often disrupt sleep. Poor sleep quality can negatively affect daily life in numerous ways, including having trouble concentrating and becoming depressed. Sleep apnea is very common in people with SCI and can have serious health consequences, such as heart disease and even death. This presentation reviews the causes and consequences of sleep problems, including a detailed discussion of sleep apnea, and explains treatments that can improve your health and well-being.   In addition, an individual with SCI talks about his personal experience with sleep apnea and its treatment. At the end, Dr. Burns takes questions from the audience.

8.17. Spasticity

Spastic Hypertonia (27 minutes)This University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) provided video defines Spastic Hypertonia (aka spasticity), explaining the advantages vs disadvantages of spasticity, and general treatment options if desired. Also offers a general understanding of sensation and reflex.

Spasticity and Spinal Cord Injury

Part 1: The Good, The Bad, and The Not-So-Ugly: Medical and Pharmacological Treatments for Spasticity

By Rina Reyes, MD, Amy Icarangal, PT, and Geralyn Bertellotti, OT.
Presented on January 13, 2015

Spasticity in spinal cord injury is often viewed as a cause of dysfunction and pain. But there is more to it than that. This SCI Forum presentation explored the positive effects of spasticity ("the good"), the negative effects ("the bad"), the neutral effects ("the not so ugly"), and a variety of interventions for spasticity. A rehabilitation medicine physician, a physical therapist, and an occupational therapist summarized the causes of spasticity and discussed a variety of conventional and non-conventional treatment options. Watch the video or read the report.

Part 2: Real Life Stories: A Panel Discussion

Presented on February 10, 2015

Spasticity is an almost universal complication of spinal cord injury, but the way it manifests itself varies enormously from person to person. In this forum, four individuals with SCI share their unique experiences with spasticity since their injuries, what treatments they have tried over the years, and how they are managing their spasticity now. The discussion is moderated by Dr. Jeanne Hoffman, UW professor and clinical psychologist in the UW Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.

 

Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy for Management of Spasticity, University of Washington Medical Center, is now available on our NWRSCSC website as streaming video and written report.  This 85 minute talk provides in-depth information about when to consider an implanted, programmable baclofen pump for spasticity management; the process of being evaluated for this treatment; the potential advantages, limitations, and drawbacks to the pump; and requirements to maintain a baclofen pump. A panel of individuals (two with spinal cord injury and one with MS) who have an implanted baclofen pump discuss their reasons for choosing the device and what the experience has been like for them.

 

9. Home Adaptations

9.1. Home Adaptations and Modifications after Spinal Cord Injury

Home adaptations and modifications after spinal cord injury
By Pam Stockman, OT, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington.
Presented on June 12, 2007, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

10. Neat stuff! (SCI/D related of course)

10.1. EasyStand Videos - Life After Spinal Cord Injury

 "Life after SCI: Spinal Cord Injury" movies help people with spinal cord injuries adapt and thrive with their new life after SCI. Also available on YouTube and on DVD

10.2. ReWalk Exoskeleton

ReWalk Video enables someone living with a paraplegic level SCI to stand, walk and use stairs following appropriate training.

Also see the

Engadget article with video

10.3. SPINALpedia

SPINALpedia is a social mentoring network and video archive that allows the spinal cord injury community to motivate each other with the knowledge and triumphs gained from individual experiences.

 

11. New injuries-DVD series

11.1. DVD-New Spinal Cord Injury

Shepherd Center Spinal Cord Injury intended for the trauma center timeframe

11.2. DVD-Understanding Brain Injury

Shepherd Center Brain Injury DVD intended for the trauma center timeframe

12. Parenting with SCI

12.1. Parenting with SCI-Panelist Discussion

The ABCs of Parenting with an SCI-90 minute panel discussion

Presented on April 8, 2014 at the University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA

Parenting is never a breeze, but parenting with a spinal cord injury can present additional and unique challenges.
Find out how others with SCI have met these challenges in this panel discussion featuring three individuals
with different injury levels who came to parenting at different points along their injury timelines: before,
during and after their injuries. They share their experiences, insights, practical tips and coping mechanisms
for handling a multitude of parenting issues.

13. Practical Skills

13.1. Floor transfer

"HOW-TO" Floor Transfer Video

 

Sydney is an on the go woman and sometimes this requires her to vacate her chair maybe for a picnic in the park or a day at the beach but also sometimes things can happen when you find yourself out of your chair and NOT by your own desire.  Take a look as Sydney demonstrates this useful skill to master of being able to transfer from her chair to the floor and back again on her own with and without assistance. Please remember that Sydney is a highly trained and experienced individual.  If you wish to learn any of these techniques supervision by a professional therapist is highly recommended and make sure you lock your wheels. Sydney's level of injury is T3-4.  

Click here to view "How-To" Floor Transfer Video. 

14. Research

14.1. SCI Research and the Hope for the Cure: Where Are We Today?

At a spring 2013 SCI Wellness Summit, held by Northwest Regional SCI System, Dr. Daniel Lammertse, MD, Medical Director of Research at Craig Hospital and co-director of Rocky Mountain Regional SCI System was the keynote speaker.  Dr. Lammertse spoke on SCI Research and the Hope for the Cure: Where Are We Today? 

In his talk, Dr. Lammertse lucidly explains the complex issues involved in SCI recovery research, discusses the most promising avenues of investigation, summarizes the current state of SCI cure research worldwide today, and reviews the risks of participating in expensive experimental treatments outside the U.S.

This excellent presentation can be viewed as a video presentation or downloaded as a power point presentation.

14.2. Developing Neuroprosthetic Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury

Developing Neuroprosthetic Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury

Dr. Chet Moritz,  Assistant Professor, Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physiology & Biophysics, University of Washington School of Medicine, conducts research in brain-computer interfaces and neuroprosthetic technology. The goal of his research is to develop systems that can bypass damaged areas of the spinal cord and restore voluntary control of movement to paralyzed muscles. His research uses a combination of animal and human studies.

In this presentation, Dr. Moritz summarizes the state of the art in this field and describes his study using brain activity to control Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) to stimulate the muscles of a paralyzed wrist. In addition to direct muscle stimulation, another promising approach is intraspinal stimulation. This technique was nearing its first clinical trial at the time of this talk. Dr. Moritz explains intraspinal stimulation and his work generating movements of the hand and arm.

14.3. Healthy Now, Ready for the Future: Being Prepared for Clinical Trials

Part of the Boston Medical Center Stepping Forward-Staying Informed Evening Lecture Series

14.4. Repairing the Spinal Cord From Within: Regeneration Potential

Repairing the spinal cord from within: Regeneration potential of the adult spinal cord .
By Philip J. Horner, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Neurosurgery, University of Washington.
Presented on April 11, 2006, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

14.5. Review of human Trials

Review of human trials of SCI and X-irradiation as well as Tempol, a nitroxide antioxidant improves locomotor function in an animal model.
By Virany Huynh Hillard, MD, Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington.
Presented on March 13, 2007, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

14.6. Stem Cells & Regeneration of the Spinal Cord

Stem Cells and Regeneration of the Spinal Cord: Practical Barriers and New Cell Technologies
By Philip J. Horner, PhD, associate professor, Department of Neurological Surgery and Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, University of Washington.
Presented on May 12, 2009, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

15. SSDI vs SSI

15.1. Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

Navigating the System: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
By Peter McKee, Attorney, Douglas, Drachler & McKee, LLP
Presented on November 13, 2007, at the University of Washington Medical Center.

16. Webinar series-archived

16.1. NSCIA webinar series

This United Spinal Association  Webinar series covers a variety of topics from sexuality to proper wheelchair provision......